An Ounce of Prevention Summer 2011 : Page 1

Prevention A newsletter for patients of University pharmacies Summer 2011 University Pharmacy (573) 882-8600 Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on holidays; Closed on Christmas and Thanksgiving University Physicians Medical Building Pharmacy (573) 882-8300 Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday Green Meadows Pharmacy (573) 882-3151 Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday Fairview Pharmacy (573) 884-1100 Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday Keene Street Pharmacy (573) 499-6022 Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday Smiley Lane Pharmacy (573) 817-3555 Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday Ellis Fischel Cancer Center Outpatient Pharmacy (573) 882-8890 Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday Missouri Orthopaedic Institute Pharmacy (573) 884-3020 Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday www.muhealth.org/pharmacy An Ounce of Prevention is a newsletter com-piled by Lee Ann Lawson, PharmD, RPh, a pharmacist for University pharmacies, to keep our customers informed of current top-ics relating to prescriptions, over-the-counter products, self-care and medical conditions. An Ounce of Poison ivy, oak and sumac Best ways to prevent and treat rashes I t’s only natural to find yourself outside enjoy-ing the great outdoors duing the summertime. However, it is important to keep in mind that mixed in with all of that beautiful scenery may be poison ivy, oak or sumac. Prevention is the best way to avoid irritation from these plants, and the key is knowing how to identify them. See the illustrations on page 2 for details. To avoid contact with any of these plants, always wear long pants and sleeves in the woods. IvyBlock lotion is the only FDA-approved agent that acts as a barrier between skin and poison ivy, oak or sumac. It needs to be applied at least 15 minutes before contact and every four hours while you’re out. The following steps will help allevi-ate discomfort from a poisonous plant: • Wash the affected area within 10 minutes or as soon as possible. The irritating component of poison ivy, oak and sumac is urushiol. Urushiol is an oil from the plant that will bind to your skin and produce the rash. Tecnu Outdoor Skin Cleanser is an over-the-counter product that can remove urushiol from the skin. This cleanser should be used within two to eight hours of exposure Wash the affected area for at least two minutes. Alternatively, washing Treatment Unfortunately, prevention is not always an option. If you’ve been exposed, you may develop a rash within hours or days. Affected skin may appear red or swollen. You may also experience itching, burning and pain. Blisters may erupt, leading to oozing or crusting of the skin. 1

Poison Ivy, Oak And Sumac

Best Ways To Prevent And Treat Rashes<br /> <br /> It’s only natural to find yourself outside enjoying the great outdoors duing the summertime. However, it is important to keep in mind that mixed in with all of that beautiful scenery may be poison ivy, oak or sumac.<br /> <br /> Prevention is the best way to avoid irritation from these plants, and the key is knowing how to identify them. See the illustrations on page 2 for details.<br /> <br /> To avoid contact with any of these plants, always wear long pants and sleeves in the woods.<br /> <br /> IvyBlock lotion is the only FDA-approved agent that acts as a barrier between skin and poison ivy, oak or sumac. It needs to be applied at least 15 minutes before contact and every four hours while you’re out.<br /> <br /> Treatment <br /> <br /> Unfortunately, prevention is not always an option. If you’ve been exposed, you may develop a rash within hours or days. Affected skin may appear red or swollen. You may also experience itching, burning and pain. Blisters may erupt, leading to oozing or crusting of the skin.<br /> <br /> The following steps will help alleviate discomfort from a poisonous plant:<br /> <br /> • Wash the affected area within 10 minutes or as soon as possible. The irritating component of poison ivy, oak and sumac is urushiol. Urushiol is an oil from the plant that will bind to your skin and produce the rash. Tecnu Outdoor Skin Cleanser is an over-the-counter product that can remove urushiol from the skin. This cleanser should be used within two to eight hours of exposure Wash the affected area for at least two minutes. Alternatively, washing with a grease-cutting liquid dish soap detergent can also help remove this oil.<br /> <br /> • Wash contaminated objects like garden tools, shoes and clothes. Wash contaminated clothes separate from other laundry. Affected pets will need to be washed because urushiol can cling to their fur.<br /> <br /> • Showering in cool or luke-warm water will help relieve itching. Avoid hot showers or baths, which can make the itching worse.<br /> <br /> • Clean under the fingernails thoroughly to prevent spreading urushiol.<br /> <br /> • Colloidal oatmeal bath products like Aveeno Bath Treatment can cleanse and soothe the area and reduce itching. Sprinkle one packet into a bathtub of warm water as the tub fills. Soak once or twice a day for 15 to 20 minutes.<br /> <br /> • Hydrocortisone cream is the most effective over-the-counter agent for relieving redness and irritation. Hydrocortisone can be applied three to four times daily. You should discontinue use after seven days if the rash is not clearing up. If the rash clears up but then gets worse, talk to your doctor. Take care if applying to your face. Hydrocortisone should not be applied to your eyelids or eye area. If the rash is oozing, use hydrocortisone cream instead of ointment because ointment can keep the area from drying properly and may trap bacteria.<br /> <br /> • Avoid topical antihistamines like diphenhydramine and anesthetics like benzocaine because they can cause additional irritation.<br /> <br /> • If the rash is oozing, mix one packet of Domeboro Astringent Solution with 16 ounces of water and apply for 15 to 30 minutes to dry up the area. Use it as needed when you apply it as a wet compress. If soaking the skin, use it no more than three times per day.<br /> <br /> • Calamine lotion can also be used if the rash is oozing, and it can be applied every four hours. Calamine may not be preferred because it leaves a pink film on the skin.<br /> <br /> Reference:<br /> <br /> 1) Plake KS, Darbishire PL. Contact dermatitis. In: Berardi RR, Ferreri SP, Hume AL, Kroon LA, Newton GD, Popovich NG, Remington TL, Rollins CJ, Shimp LA, Tietze KJ, editors. Handbook of nonprescription drugs: an interactive approach to self-care. 16th ed. Washington D.C.: American Pharmacists Association; 2009. P. 657-673.<br /> <br /> How to identify poison ivy and oak<br /> <br /> Poison ivy and oak have three leaves coming from one central stem, with the middle leaf at the end of the stem.<br /> <br /> Poison ivy and oak flower feature small white five-petal flowers during the spring. Their leaves change from green to red or yellow throughout the year.<br /> <br /> Poison sumac has red stems throughout the year, and it has leaves in odd numbers, ranging from five to 13. Its leaves also change from green to red throughout the year.

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