Earth Imaging Journal July/August 2016 : Page 2

INDUSTRY OVERVIEW Staff JULY/AUGUST 2016 VOL. 13 NO. 4 Todd Danielson Editor tdanielson@v1-media.com 970-846-8831 Jeff Boone Senior Project Manager jboone@v1-media.com Kevin Carmody Group Publisher kcarmody@v1-media.com 312-771-9818 Matt Ball Editorial Director mball@v1-media.com 720-255-8127 Darin Sanders Art Director dsanders@v1-media.com Patrick Krill Global Accounts Director pkrill@v1-media.com 414-225-0101 Imagery Fully Integrated I t’s difficult to believe there was a time with parallel worlds of GIS and imagery. Now they’re tightly tied and getting more tightly integrated. To highlight such coupling, attendees of the recent Esri International User Conference received a complimentary copy of The ArcGIS Imagery Book , which outlines the evolution of the two tools, how they’re coming together in 2D and 3D, and how the future is an intelligent image. Parul Dubey Operations and Advertising pdubey@v1-media.com About Earth Imaging Journal Earth Imaging Journal is committed to offering its readers a true information clearinghouse for remote-sensing news, products and services, applications, and more. To comple-ment the magazine, the Earth Imaging Journal Web site (w ww.eijournal.com ) provides daily updates. Intelligence Integrated It’s interesting to think of the legacy of Landsat, an amazing dataset that started in 1972 but only recently was truly unleashed with an easy (and free) means to digitally download from the archive. It was the first planetary view that sparked the imagination and inspired the concept of an explorable Digital Earth. Today, we can view and simulate planetary phenomena such as ocean currents, winds and seasonal climate patterns. We can filter light to determine vegetation health, and see through the dark and clouds. We can look back in time to compare the past to the present. We can capture detailed 3D models with oblique imagery. And we can do so much more. About V1 Media V1 Media is a global integrated media and education com-pany serving individuals who measure, model and manage our natural world as well as design, develop and engineer today’s built infrastructure. Additional publications include Informed Infrastructure , Sensors & Systems , Asian Surveying & Mapping and the GeoSpatial Stream video news site. Editorial Contributions Earth Imaging Journal welcomes ideas for news and feature articles. If you have questions about Earth Imaging Journal or would like to submit an article, please contact Todd Danielson ( tdanielson@v1-media.com ). Advertising For information about advertising in Earth Imaging Journal , please contact Patrick Krill (414-225-0101, pkrill@v1-media. com ). Subscriptions Timely Connections There’s an idea of a “reactive GIS” that’s capable of cataloging and understanding the world and comparing new inputs to understand change. Imagery is a tremendous input to such instant understanding, and regular imagery updates are the primary source to decode what has changed. With more satellites expected, rapid understanding on a planetary scale is possible, and it’s happening. Parallel to the satellite-provided global view, we’re getting much more capable with drones that are becoming far less restricted. An eye-opening example is the recent release of Drone2Map, which automates the processing of drone imagery to create orthomosaics and 3D meshes that then are readily integrated within ArcGIS. This capability comes from an alliance between Esri and 3D Robotics and brings a whole new level of automation as well as a very-high-resolution data source to deploy on demand. Esri shares a vision of the intelligent image, where things such as on-board analytics will return processed imagery quickly, assisted by the infinite computing of the cloud. Imagery sources and volumes are exploding at every scale, and it’s exciting to think how dynamic maps can become. Imagery could be thought of as the more-exciting cousin that goes out on adventures, while GIS sticks to the books. In the future, however, both may be bachelors or spinsters, because we could start calling this dynamic duo something entirely new: perhaps “intelligent image,” “dynamic map,” “smart map” or maybe … just “map.” — Matt Ball, founder and editorial director, V1 Media Earth Imaging Journal is available free in print to those who live in the United States and digitally distributed worldwide. To subscribe, please visit the Earth Imaging Journal Web site at www.eijournal.com/subscribe . Please e-mail subscription questions and mailing-address changes to subscriptions@eijournal.com . Reprints Article reprints are available for marketing and educational purposes. For more information, please contact Patrick Krill (414-225-0101, pkrill@v1-media.com ). Editorial Advisory Board David Belton , vice president, MDA Geospatial Services John Copple , CEO, Sanborn Jack Cothren , director, Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies, University of Arkansas John Delay , CSO/Architect MI, Harris Government Communications Solutions Shawana P. Johnson , president, Global Marketing Insights Alex Philp , founder and chief science officer, Upstream Health Systems Brian R. Raber , vice president, Geomatics, Merrick & Company Walter Scott , founder, executive vice president and chief technical officer, DigitalGlobe Mladen Stojic , president, Hexagon Geospatial Bill Wilt , vice president, North American Sales, GeoEye Earth Imaging Journal (ISSN 1548-0720) is published bimonthly by V1 Media 8421 E. Oregon Place Denver, CO 80231 Copyright 2016 V1 Media. Printed in the United States. No material may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. Although trademark and copyright symbols aren’t used in this publication, they are honored. © 2016 V1 Media, www.eijournal.com Twitter @eijournal 2 JULY/AUGUST 2016 © 2016 V1 Media, www.eijournal.com

Industry Overview

Imagery Fully Integrated
It’s difficult to believe there was a time with parallel worlds of GIS and imagery. Now they’re tightly tied and getting more tightly integrated.

To highlight such coupling, attendees of the recent Esri International User Conference received a complimentary copy of The ArcGIS Imagery Book, which outlines the evolution of the two tools, how they’re coming together in 2D and 3D, and how the future is an intelligent image.

Intelligence Integrated

It’s interesting to think of the legacy of Landsat, an amazing dataset that started in 1972 but only recently was truly unleashed with an easy (and free) means to digitally download from the archive. It was the first planetary view that sparked the imagination and inspired the concept of an explorable Digital Earth.

Today, we can view and simulate planetary phenomena such as ocean currents, winds and seasonal climate patterns. We can filter light to determine vegetation health, and see through the dark and clouds. We can look back in time to compare the past to the present. We can capture detailed 3D models with oblique imagery. And we can do so much more.

Timely Connections

There’s an idea of a “reactive GIS” that’s capable of cataloging and understanding the world and comparing new inputs to understand change. Imagery is a tremendous input to such instant understanding, and regular imagery updates are the primary source to decode what has changed. With more satellites expected, rapid understanding on a planetary scale is possible, and it’s happening.

Parallel to the satellite-provided global view, we’re getting much more capable with drones that are becoming far less restricted. An eyeopening example is the recent release of Drone2Map, which automates the processing of drone imagery to create orthomosaics and 3D meshes that then are readily integrated within ArcGIS. This capability comes from an alliance between Esri and 3D Robotics and brings a whole new level of automation as well as a very-high-resolution data source to deploy on demand.

Esri shares a vision of the intelligent image, where things such as on-board analytics will return processed imagery quickly, assisted by the infinite computing of the cloud. Imagery sources and volumes are exploding at every scale, and it’s exciting to think how dynamic maps can become.

Imagery could be thought of as the more-exciting cousin that goes out on adventures, while GIS sticks to the books. In the future, however, both may be bachelors or spinsters, because we could start calling this dynamic duo something entirely new: perhaps “intelligent image,” “dynamic map,” “smart map” or maybe … just “map.”

— Matt Ball, founder and editorial director, V1 Media

Read the full article at http://bluetoad.com/article/Industry+Overview/2547370/325756/article.html.

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