Techniques Magazine Techniques March 2011 : Page 41

— Secret By CARL CIMINO A re you truly dedicated to your craft? If you were asked to refrain from most vices, avoid getting married, and to work for little or no compensation in exchange for learning a craft—would you be willing to commit? In the early 1800s these were the requirements young apprentices com-mitted to in order to learn from master craftsman in fields such as carpentry and furniture making. Apprenticeships were also very gender specific; clearly Title IX was not a factor in those days. Fortunately, apprenticeships have evolved over the years! While today’s apprentice -ship programs continue to include the much needed hands-on training that was afforded our predecessors, apprenticeship programs now include a classroom com-ponent, doing away with the draconian practices of yore. In California, apprentices enroll in programs that are accredited through the Office of Apprenticeship (OA) at the federal level and the Division of Appren-ticeship Standards (DAS) at the state level. “While today’s apprenticeship programs continue to include the much needed hands-on training that was afforded our predecessors, apprenticeship programs now include a classroom component, doing away with the draconian practices of yore.” Just a few years ago, California, the larg-est player in apprenticeship in the country, boasted more than 70,000 apprentices. New York, the next closest state had less than half that amount. The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) describes an apprenticeship as “a combi-nation of on-the-job training (OJT) and related instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation.” As part of their commitment to DAS, apprenticeship programs monitor a student’s OJT hours and partner with a Local Educational Agency (LEA) to develop the supporting classroom component. The goal is for the instruction in the classroom and the in-struction on the jobsite to complement one another—promoting stronger competen-cies on both sides of the equation. Related supplemental instruction focuses on the principles an individual must understand in order to learn on the jobsite. Related math and science classes, as well as safety-and building code-related courses, lay the groundwork for jobsite learning. LEAs are typically community colleges or regional career and technical education (CTE) centers that help with curriculum development, March 2011 Techniques www.acteonline.org 41

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here